In the News: Making the Most Out of Algal Blooms

What exactly is blue-green algae?  What can we do to minimize it in our lakes?  Learn more about this topic in a recent Auburn Citizen Eco Talk column article by Sheila.  You can find the article here.

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In the News: Using Apps to Improve Local Water Quality

Want to learn more about the Owasco Lake Watershed Tool we are developing to reduce phosphorus losses to Owasco Lake?  You can read more about the tool and about how you can help in this Auburn Citizen Eco Talk article.

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In the News: How to Reduce Our Phosphorus Footprint

Here is the fourth educational article on phosphorus published in the Auburn Citizen, Eco Talk column on Mar 28 (see article link below).  This article explains what we can do as individuals to reduce our phosphorus footprint.

March 28th Eco Talk Article on Ways to Reduce Our Phosphorus Footprint

(For the the first article in this series see our previous blog entries from Feb 13Feb 21, and Mar 21.

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In the News: Phosphorus Transport

Here is the third educational article on phosphorus published in the Auburn Citizen, Eco Talk column on Mar 21 (see article link below).  This article explains how phosphorus is transported in the environment.

March 21st Eco Talk Article on Phosphorus Transport

(For the the first article in this series see our previous blog entries from Feb 13 and Feb 21.

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In the News: Forms of Phosphorous in the Environment

Here is the second educational article on phosphorus published in the Auburn Citizen, Eco Talk column on Feb 21 (see article link below).  This article introduces the two dominant (physical) forms of phosphorus in the landscape: dissolved and particulate.

February 21th Eco Talk Article on Phosphorus Forms in the Environment

(For the the first article in this series see our previous blog entry from Feb 13.)

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In the News: Phosphorus Basics

I’ve been working on a series of articles on phosphorus for the Auburn Citizen, Eco Talk column.  The first of these educational articles, published on February 7 (see article link below), introduces readers to phosphorus and explains why too much of it can be bad for the environment.  Stay tuned for the three follow up articles on phosphorus forms, phosphorus transport, and ways you can reduce your phosphorus footprint.

February 7th Eco Talk Article on Phosphorus Basics

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In the News: Cuomo Makes Water Quality Grants Available To Farms

Cuomo Makes Water Quality Grants Available To Farms

January 20, 2014
The Post-Journal

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo has made $12 million available to help farms implement water quality conservation systems that will help make New York’s farms cleaner and safer.

The funding is available to county Soil and Water Conservation Districts through the New York State Environmental Protection Fund. Grants will be administered by the state Department of Agriculture and Markets and the New York State Soil and Water Conservation Committee.

“New York’s agricultural industry has been an economic success story for the past three years and its continued growth depends on keeping our farms safe and clean,” Cuomo said. “This $12 million will help local farmers across New York maintain a clean water supply which is vital to their livelihood. With our support, New York’s farms are going to continue to expand, creating more jobs and making our state’s home grown products popular across the country.”

Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution is runoff from agricultural lands that has the potential to enter water bodies. This funding will help farmers work with County Soil and Water Conservation Districts to prevent such pollution from occurring by employing soil erosion prevention methods, planting vegetation along streams to prevent runoff, adopting nutrient management systems, and planting cover crops after the annual harvest to protect the soil.

County Soil and Water Conservation Districts can apply for grants under the Agricultural Nonpoint Source Abatement and Control Program (AgNPS Program) Request for Proposals (RFP). The AgNPS Program is a competitive grant program that awards funding to County Soil and Water Conservation Districts. In turn, these Districts will address water quality challenges facing farms in priority watersheds throughout the state.

Conservation districts utilize the state’s Agricultural Environmental Management framework to help farmers meet these challenges head on. The AEM framework sets water quality priorities and helps farmers develop specific plans to qualify for implementation through the AgNPS Program.

Administered through the County Soil and Water Conservation Districts, AEM helps farms make common sense, cost-effective and science-based decisions to help meet business objectives while protecting and conserving the State’s natural resources. Currently, more than 13,000 farms participate in AEM, which has helped install 5,000 new conservation practices with the assistance of AgNPS Program funds. Since the program’s inception in 1993, New York State has dedicated more than $125 million to the AgNPS Program.

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